Monday, October 23, 2017

FilmFish – The New Way of Finding Great Movies and TV Shows

When I recently came about FilmFish, a new movie/TV show recommendation service, I didn’t have too many expectations. After all, we live in the world where everyone recommends everything all the time. This is probably one of the reasons I kind of gave up on many traditional resources that were once very relevant to me. As the social media phenomenon took off, so did the concept of recommendation became blurred and lost in the previously mentioned social media noise.

But, as I soon realized, FilmFish was something completely different. Now, two weeks after I first started using it, I can safely say it is the best alternative cinematographic recommendation websites I ever came across. Firstly, it offers an across-the-board recommendation for TV shows, including all the major league players like Amazon Prime, Netflix, Hulu, and HBO. This way, it elegantly bypasses the problem of native service recommendations where they only suggest their in-house content.



However, it is the actual FilmFish recommendation process that makes it such a killer platform for exploring and discovering new content. It uses a combination of machine learning with personal curation coming from those who are well versed in the movie industry. The “people” side of the service includes a mix of very talented and diverse professionals from all corners of the film world. This is why individuals like the actor Topher Grace and Joyce Kulhawik, the co-host of the late and great Roger Ebert are on the FilmFish team.

With this mixture, it manages to provide stunning results even for someone like me, who has been, at least in my view, well informed about the TV and movie industries in the last 15 years. Its front page show a number of thematic lists that are very colorful and interesting, but the service really shines with its search feature. It is enough to try out its search function and see the magic takes place in front of your own eyes. Once a reference point is inserted, the service lists its results both in the TV show and movie domains. I personally began to experiment with the service in a slow manner, but then started to ramp up my searches with things like Peaky Blinders, a TV show that is unique in its topic and delivery.

Looking at it from the perspective of genre classification, it is a crime series featuring a crime family. But, in its case, the FilmFish search first recommends Boardwalk Empire, Taboo, and Deadwood, all of which are not only great shows. But, they are also very relevant to Peaky Blinders being that they reside firstly not on the crime stories themselves, but a strong sense of depicting real history. Additionally, all of them are completely brutal in their representation of those particular times and on many additional levels, they all singly fit inside of a FilmFish category that combines all relevant traits.

At the same time, the functionality of the site is expectedly high and allows for easy future exploration once a person finds their pick, including watching its trailer or adding it to their watch list. Fortunately, the creators of FilmFish did not fall into the trap of trying to make it too cluttered with additional possibilities and options. From a user experience point of view, its layout and usefulness are flawless.

Thanks to all of this, I must sincerely recommend FilmFish to anyone who is sick and tired of the same old ways of trying to find new movies and TV shows. I have no doubt that the service will only become better as time goes by, so head on to FilmFish.com and start using it right now!

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